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Resultados para la búsqueda "digital transformation" : 4 resultados
Gender (in)equality in organisations: Progress and stagnation in Spain
Susana González, Ruth Mateos

This work analyses the advances in regard to gender equality which have contributed to the fact that Spain ranks among the 10 leading countries in the latest edition of the Gender Gap Report by the World Economic Forum. This progress is mostly due to the improvement in the political representation of women in ministerial positions and in parliament. However, the economic participation of women in Spain evidences extensive room for improvement, especially in relation to the representation in corporate leadership positions and to a worrying underrepresentation in the emerging professions resulting from the digital transformation. To conclude, the work offers a series of recommendations for improving the economic empowerment of women when it comes to reaching positions of high corporate responsibility. It also recommends to prevent and improve the future economic gap in respect to women’s underrepresentation in science, research and technology professions.

The new professional profiles in the context of Industry 4.0
Xavier Pi Palomés, Pere Tuset-Peiró

This article analyses the reasons that limit the adoption of new technologies and slow down the digital transformation process of companies in the industrial sector. Beyond technical or economic aspects, the origin of the slowdown lies in the lack of transversality of existing professional profiles in the context of Industry 4.0. In view of this, the article also analyses the labour impact and the new professional profiles that will be necessary to deal with the digital transformation process, as well as the role that will be played by experts, working groups and diagnostic tools in this process.

Fintech and the reinvention of finance
David Igual Molina

The banking industry is facing a major transformation of its activity due to the need to reinvent its services (which are expensive and not designed for online use), the change in user demand for digital products and the need to adjust inefficient structures. Traditionally the financial sector has been almost exclusively an area for financial institutions, but the falling cost of technologies has led to the emergence of new players in the industry, such as fintechs, with alternative proposals in all spheres of financial activity, through new mobile-first and data-driven formulas. However, after a few years, most of these new companies experience scalability problems and, going against their original philosophy, they end up collaborating with banks, generating a partnership of mutual interest: fintechs contribute to the transformation of the bank, and with the support of the bank, they achieve growth that they would not achieve alone. Through these banking-fintech partnerships, a paradox arises in that these entities which initially challenged the banks may end up being their point of support, ensuring the change to the banking sector is quicker and more transformational than disruptive. Conversely, the fintechs that remain in competition with the banks (between 20% and 25%) are forced into mergers, agreements, etc. in order to break-even. In Spain, the growth problems in these areas of competition with the banks (robo-advisors and crowdlending) seem even more intense than in other countries.

The most significant problem for banks comes from the large tech operators that have the capacity to unseat financial institutions in some of the most profitable spheres of activity. It seems impossible for banks to maintain total control of the business in the spheres that are shared with tech operators, such as purchase payments and money transfers. However, banks have an advantage in terms of their widely-recognised customer data protection management, which is a value in which they clearly exceed the fintechs.

Banks are developing multiple agreement strategies with fintechs, such as direct purchases, acceleration and incubation programmes, venture capital funds, service agreements and partnership agreements. Proper analysis of each area of innovation is crucial to identify the contributions made by a fintech, and the key variables are the capacity to generate volume and ability to displace current banking services. This article proposes a relationship model consisting of the gradual integration of fintechs into banking environments through: i) integration into the core of the bank; ii) collaboration or service agreements; iii) contributing to their development through acceleration and incubation programmes and the launch of “challenger” programmes or competitions to discover talent.

Rail track gauge and logistics 4.0 in the Mediterranean Corridor
Domingo Pérez Mira

The Mediterranean Corridor is a double high-speed railway that will run from the French border to Algeciras, joining cities as important as Barcelona, Valencia, Alicante, Murcia and Malaga, and connecting them in turn with the rest of Europe. However, it is necessary to develop gauge change technologies for railway platforms, since, in Europe, there are several track gauges that hinder the transit of goods by rail.

Logistics 4.0 modifies business operations and business processes to incorporate new tools and digital uses. It is a complete and integral transformation process, based on the digitization of information throughout the whole process, from the initial phases right through to the arrival of the end product to the customer, as well as integrating reverse logistics.

The convergence of variable-width axes rail technology for freight transport with Logistics 4.0 in SCM (Supply Chain Management) processes will allow increasing productivity and business competitiveness at an international level.

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