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Resultados para la búsqueda "sustainability" : 10 resultados
25 years of responsible evolution towards sustainability
August Corrons

In a socioeconomic situation like our current one, it is difficult to understand the future of organizations without considering social responsibility. Looking at this future with a certain guarantee of success requires looking back to learn and gather drive. This article presents the evolution of social responsibility over the last twenty-five years, analyzing international and national initiatives, legislative instruments and self-regulatory framework, progress in commitment and level of involvement of organizations, as well as the consequences of Covid-19. Important progress is noted, with organizations that are increasingly conscious of the impact of their activities, making socially responsible decisions beyond their legal obligations. However, there is still much to do in the management of a social responsibility that guarantees sustainability and sustainable development in the medium and long term.

Actions and challenges that have shaped business management over the past 25 years
Fernando Álvarez, Agustí Canals, Mónica Cerdán, Natàlia Cugueró-Escofet, Dalilis Escobar, Àngels Fitó Bertran, Laura Lamolla , Josep Lladós-Masllorens, Enric Serradell, Pere Suau-Sanchez

Coinciding with the twenty-fifth anniversary celebration of the UOC, the following article aims to review the main transformations that the basic areas of business have undergone over the past two and a half decades. For this, we have enjoyed the participation of five female and five male professors in the studies of economy and business, who have given us some broad strokes on some of the main changes during this period and the challenges still to come. These topics are: leadership, decision-making, internationalization, digitalization, strategy, adaptation to change, ethics, corporate social responsibility, diversity, inclusion, business modal innovation, and finance.

The evolution of logistics: past, present and future
Marta Viu Roig, Cristian Castillo

The objective of this article is to analyze the evolution of logistics in three different contexts: past, present and future. By looking at where the concept of logistics began and the point it has now reached, we can understand and better anticipate the trends and logistical challenges of the future. We live in an era where digitalization is increasing rapidly, which enables us to obtain more data, more transparency, a greater capacity for anticipating change and a greater automatization of processes. In addition, the health crisis of COVID-19 has only accelerated the use of electronic devices and online tools, as shown by the increasing figures in e-commerce over the last two years. However, the pandemic has also shone a spotlight on the need to rethink the current logistical model. Aspects such as globalization, sustainability, resilience or security throughout the supply chain are in question. In this changing context, the skills and competencies of logistics professionals will undoubtedly decide future success.

Urbanization, land occupancy and supporting infrastructure
Mireia Hernández Asensi, Eduard J. Álvarez-Palau

In 2015, the UN General Assembly approved the 2030 Agenda. There was an agreement on 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the purpose of which was to reverse development patterns around the planet. Cities, as population agglomerations and production centres, are directly challenged actors. The growth patterns followed in recent years show a clear explosion of the urban fabric, and an unprecedented land occupancy. So much so that certain degraded urban sectors are being abandoned to the detriment of new construction sectors located in the urban periphery. The connotations of this phenomenon are multiple, but it is important to focus on the unsustainability of an urban growth model based on urban development, land occupancy and transport infrastructures that have not been planned in coordination with these urban projects. Based on the foregoing, this article reflects on the externalities of this phenomenon, and raises some reflections to help transition towards a more sustainable city model.

Contradictions and promises of circular economy
Zora Kovacic

Circular economy is an alternative to the linear “extract-use-dispose” economic model, based on the ideas of recycling, repair and reuse. The circular economy promises to turn the trade-offs of unsustainable economic growth in a limited planet into synergies that make sustainability a growth strategy. The knowledge base of the circular economy, however, is highly divided and characterised by controversy over the very possibility of circularity itself. This paper asks why such a controversial idea has gained so much traction in public policies, at the EU level and at lower scales, such as the urban level. Although the focus on win-win solutions was understandable in the context in which the first circular economy policies were formulated in the EU, in the current context this policy framing may obfuscate more than it enlightens by rendering debates about complex sustainability issues technical and apolitical.

Flexicurity or the paradigm of welfare to workfare in the current Spanish post-recession period
Purificación Baldoví

The Spanish economy is more productive but employment rates have not returned to levels prior to the recession. Therefore, the main challenge is reducing unemployment and temporary employment, creating quality, stable and productive jobs that help reduce inequality, as well as resuming the path of convergence with more advanced economies. The model of flexicurity is defined as a strategy to modernize the labour market through two paths that converge: flexibility (for both business and workers, to respond to the needs of both) and safety (for workers who must be able to develop their careers, expand their skills and receive support from social security systems during periods of inactivity). However, this model of Danish flexicurity cannot be implemented directly to each Member State or region of the European Union, but rather it must be adapted to each context with an adequate combination of instruments that respond in our region to the debate between different social and political sensitivities. The goal is not increasing precariousness through flexibility, but rather flexible specialization.

Research in the field of sustainable tourism
Francesc González Reverté

This contribution seeks to provide an overview of current research into sustainable tourism from two angles. It describes firstly the key arguments in the theoretical discussion on the idea of sustainability in the tourism sector, and secondly the areas of academic research that are of interest for research into tourism and sustainability. This study will enable a global evaluation of not only the factors that influence the discussion on the sustainability of tourism, but also the central thematic areas in which this matter is addressed.

Our world is finite, and so is tourism ¿ from tourism multipliers to redistributive conflict
Jordi Gascón, Ernest Cañada

The assumption that tourism growth can be sustainable is widespread in certain academic sectors and public institutions. It is an assumption that is partly founded on the Tourist Multiplier theory, proposed by Archer and Owen in the early 1970s. However, this premise is coming up against an increasingly urgent reality: the finite nature of our planet and its resources. Economic development has natural limits. The article presents a conflictivist view of tourism development that is more in line with this reality: The emergence of new economic activity – or its growth – forces us to restructure our use of the available resources. These resources cannot always be multiplied. And as part of this process, some will lose and others will win.

Monetary panarchy
August Corrons

This article analyses the sustainability of the monetary system, with a systemic focus based in complex thinking. This thinking is far removed from the simple and the conventional, considering not only the distinct actors involved in the system but also the relationships and interactions between them. It is a way of thinking that views systems not as static or permanent, but as dynamic equilibriums linked to adaptation and change.

Being a socio-ecological system, the monetary system is subject to the dynamic behaviour of an adaptive cycle, which in turn is part of a panarchy of systems drawn to different scales across space and time. It is only when one considers this nested network of interconnected systems that it is possible to ensure the sustainability of each system individually and of the group as a whole.

The current monopoly of money in the form of bank debt has reached a point where it is so rigid and centralized it has become unsustainable. Proof of this can be seen in the systemic crisis we are currently living in. From a systemic focus based in complex thinking, this article analyses how the introduction of complementary currencies into the monetary system is one way in which its sustainability can be improved, also contributing to the sustainability of the planetary system as a whole, both economically and environmentally.

Lluerna, a social business model for rural electrification
Daniel Caballé, Alexandre Mollá, Gil Blanch

Lluerna is a business plan developed by students from both the UOC's Executive MBA course and its MBA in Social Entrepreneurship course.

This work combines classical techniques from business schools with a more innovative approach related to impact-centred (rather than profit-centred) businesses. This business plan demonstrates that it is possible to run a sustainable company with a social objective, in this case the electrification of rural areas.

Furthermore, the plan shows a profitable business model that can be exported to many countries, where it is possible to create a market with a remarkable positive impact on a great number of families. Specifically, Lluerna is implemented in Bolivia, a country with an important lack of rural electrification, and where significant levels of collaboration from local actors in the area of rural electrification can be found.

Lluerna is also an example of how putting together new technologies and new commerce management tools makes it possible to generate a positive impact, even with a population that is normally considered too poor to be part of the market.

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